Month: March 2012
TS 27W [Pre-SENDONG] – Update #004 - March 22, 2012 by dharkanjhel

  for Wednesday, 14 December 2011 [5:45 PM PhT] Typhoon2000 (T2K) NEWS (Wednesday Dec 14 2011): Currently issuing 6-hrly web, email, & iTyphoon app updates (except 12:00 Midnight) on 27W (Pre-SENDONG). 27W (Pre-SENDONG) MAX WIND SPEED PER AGENCY: + USA (JTWC/1-min avg): 65 km/
Bushman’s Typhoon Blog

Kate Pace Way is closed from First Ave through to Second Ave - March 22, 2012 by dharkanjhel

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Services Department
News Release

********************

The Parks, Recreation and Leisure Services Department wishes to advise the public that the Kate Pace Way … continued on BayToday.ca
BayToday.ca News

Catastrophe Bonds: 2011 Review – Market Dynamics, Outlook - March 21, 2012 by dharkanjhel

Market Dynamics
Though primary issuance is likely to be down relative to 2010, 2011 stands as one of the most active, innovative and robust years in the convergence market’s history….



Continue reading…
GCCapitalIdeas.com

What Preliminary Damage Assessments Really Mean - March 20, 2012 by dharkanjhel
Posted by: Mark Peterson, Public Affairs

Over the past several weeks, we’ve talked a lot about supporting several states (Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia) with joint preliminary damage assessments as a result of the recent wave of severe storms and tornadoes, and I wanted to provide a little information into what this means, and what a PDA team does when they are on the ground.

PDA Teams

Following a disaster, a Governor requests PDAs as the first step in the declaration process. Federal representatives, including the U.S. Small Business Administration, join state, tribal, and local officials to form what we call “PDA teams.” They are responsible for surveying damages in designated counties, and they do this by going city-by-city, street-by-street, door-to-door, until impacted areas identified by state, tribal, and local officials have been thoroughly assessed.

The joint PDA teams are not just looking at the numbers of damaged or destroyed homes, they’re also obtaining information on the impact to the community as a whole. In larger disasters or when affected areas are inaccessible, PDAs may be conducted by car or plane.

They talk to as many residents as possible to ensure detailed assessments are made. From walking door-to-door in neighborhoods that have experienced damage, to sometimes walking among debris piles and engaging one-on-one with survivors who have been personally impacted, the PDA teams conduct their assessments to fully understand how the disaster has and will impact you and your family. Even when the damage may not seem apparent, the team is looking for all types and signs of damage, such as water lines from flooding, damaged roof and windows, and damage to doors and windows.

Many of the questions the teams may ask are aimed to garner a clear understanding of the impacts, including: whether you have insurance; whether your utilities are out; whether you have a place to stay; was your job affected; did your children need to change schools; was your car damaged; and do you have special medical needs.

A PDA team may not need to talk to every survivor. If a disaster survivor has already reported their damages to local or state officials, those reports will be shared with the PDA team and cross-referenced with the street report, and then all of the information will be considered for the assessments.

Along with assessing the damages that affected individuals within a community, PDA teams consisting of state, federal, tribal and local officials will also assess the impact of the incident on public infrastructure. This includes the cost of emergency measures, such as debris removal, and repair or restoration of public facilities such as roads and buildings.

Once assessments for a jurisdiction such as a county or parish are completed, the team moves onto the next as the effort is consolidated to help out in other areas. The goal is to complete the job efficiently and thoroughly to ensure the teams have captured the total impact to the communities and area of the state affected by the disaster.

The Next Step

Once all of the data has been compiled, it’s turned over to the state’s Emergency Management Agency.

It is important to remember that PDA teams do not determine whether a major disaster declaration will be issued.

The information that is collected is provided to the state for a governor to determine if he or she will request federal assistance. If the Governor believes the damages “are beyond state and local capabilities,” he or she will submit the written request to the President and specify the type of assistance needed and which counties are affected. It is important to remember that FEMA assistance is supplementary in nature and will only be authorized when a disaster is of the severity and magnitude to be beyond the effective response of the state and effected local governments. Moreover, legally, FEMA cannot duplicate assistance received through any other source including insurance or other federal programs.

What Should I Be Doing Now?

What should you do while the Governor’s request is pending? As soon as possible, notify your insurance company and file a claim. Keep your receipts of any disaster-related expenses such as lodging, medical, repair and cleaning supplies, etc. You should also make a list of the major items that have been damaged such as utilities, appliances, furniture, and personal property.

If you have immediate needs such as shelter, food, water, clothing, etc., you should seek help from the local voluntary and faith-based groups in your area.

What is a Major Disaster Declaration?

If the President approves the request, the declaration will specify what forms of assistance are available. If the Presidential declaration includes Individual Assistance, then individuals can apply if their county was part of the declaration. Even if you have already reported your damage to the Red Cross, local, or state officials, and the PDA team stopped to talk with you – this IS NOT THE APPLICATION for FEMA assistance.

To be considered eligible for federal assistance, you need to apply with FEMA once a declaration has been made – either by calling our toll-free number (Call (800) 621-3362 / TTY (800) 462-7585) or registering on our full website or mobile site.

We understand that dealing with the aftermath of a disaster is a stressful and trying time, and we hope that you will never need to go through the process of assessing and reporting damages. The true fact is that disasters happen, and every bit of knowledge we have about the process arms us all in a way to make the recovery just maybe a small bit easier.

FEMA Blog

The Unique Adventures Of Palau - March 20, 2012 by dharkanjhel

When looking for new and unique places to visit you may want to check out Palau. One of the world’s newest countries, not to mention smallest, it is rich in nature and culture. Go ahead and grab your passport or if needed get an expedited US passport to make your trip to Palau happen.

Passports

With a valid United States passport, a person is allowed to travel freely all over the globe. Also, a American passport allows a United States citizen access back into America when they are finished traveling abroad. If you are thinking about going out of the country, and need to do so soon, you can hire a company that will be able to offer expedited passports. This process, while being a little bit more expensive, only takes a couple of days to complete.

History

After a long and arduous process of ratifying amendments to its constitution, Palau established itself as a country for the first time in 1993. The country is very small and is located in the Pacific Ocean. Before 1993, the country was considered a part of the United Nations Trusteeship. In 1993, instead of joining the Federation States of Micronesia, the people of Palau opted instead for independence.

Activities

Palau boasts many amazing nature sites and has some of the best diving opportunities in the world. Palau is known as one of the underwater wonders of the world. Palau offers a variety of diving tours and charters sure to suit any diver’s interests.

Jellyfish Lake

One of the most popular attractions in all of Palau is called Jellyfish Lake. This fantastic spot is located in the Rock Islands, which are part of Eil Malk Island in Palau. If you go by the name, you may think that this is a terrible place to spend the day swimming and diving. However, the millions of jellyfish here do not sting, and it is actually a fantastic place to go diving. The lake is actually connected to the Pacific Ocean through fissures and openings that naturally occur in the limestone of the ancient Miocene reef.

Swimming With Dolphins

Other activities in Palau consist of dolphin encounters, swimming up close and personal with the intelligent mammals. There are also kayaks that can be rented. There is so much to do and see on the island of Palau, from Jellyfish Lake to kayaking with the dolphins, it is a great experience.

Culture

Palau, even though it is only a few years old, has an incredibly rich culture and history. There have been people living on the island for almost five thousand years. IF you are in Palau, you can visiti one of the many museums that highlight the wonderful heritage of the people and culture of Palau. If you are interested in learning more about the people and places in Palau, you can sign up for one of the many wonderful guided tours that are offered.

Calling for Nominations for National Youth Preparedness Council - March 19, 2012 by dharkanjhel
Posted by: Paulette Aniskoff, Director, Individual and Community Preparedness Division

FEMA’s Individual and Community Preparedness Division is looking for youth leaders dedicated to public service and making a difference in their community to serve on FEMA’s National Youth Preparedness Council.

Bringing youth to the table provides a clear and true picture of the thoughts, needs, and capabilities of nearly 25% of our nation’s population. It is critical to listen to them and their peers, align our youth strategies as an agency to the message we hear, and to build up our nation’s future leaders in emergency preparedness.

The National Youth Preparedness Council is an opportunity for select youth leaders interested in expanding their impact as a national advocate for youth preparedness to serve on this highly distinguished national council. Members of the council will participate in a community preparedness roundtable event in Washington, D.C., and voice their opinions, experiences, ideas, solutions and questions on youth disaster preparedness with the leadership of national organizations working on youth preparedness.

Who is Eligible?

Young men and women from 12 to 17 years of age who want to make a difference in their community, have contributed to youth disaster preparedness in their community or have lived through a disaster and want to share their experiences are eligible to apply for the council.

Youth Preparedness Council nominees will represent a variety of young people: current and former students, youth members of a local Citizen Corps Council, a youth club or a member of a faith-based organization that is vocal and active in preparing peers, family, and neighborhoods for potential emergencies are encouraged to apply.

Similarly, if you know of a young person with any of these qualities, you may nominate him or her to serve on the council.

Interested in Applying?

Interested candidates or nominations should emphasize youth disaster preparedness activities that the candidate/nominee has participated in or can be related to a disaster the candidate/nominee has lived through. Nominations should describe a specific emergency situation and/or examples of youth disaster preparedness activities that would qualify the nominee to serve on the Council.

Some examples of preparedness activities include:

  • Teen CERT in Action
  • Citizen Corps Council Activities
  • After School Activities
  • Faith-based Youth Preparedness Activities
  • Increasing Local Disaster Awareness
  • Youth Club Activities (e.g., Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts)

If you are nominating yourself, you must submit a letter of recommendation from any adult parent, guardian, community first responder, teacher or community leader that can attest to your community preparedness activities. If you are an adult nominating a young person to serve on the council, you do not have to include an additional letter unless you choose to do so.

Nominations must be received by April 6, 11:59 p.m. EDT. For complete instructions on applying, visit our website.

Youth Preparedness Council Participants will be announced in May 2012, and will be FEMA’s honored guests at a community preparedness roundtable event in Washington, D.C. on June 28 and 29.

Visit our website for more information on the National Youth Preparedness Council or to apply.

FEMA Blog

Making Inside Sales Through Outsourcing Companies - March 19, 2012 by dharkanjhel

Plenty of people are taking the time to ask queries or establish friendship and hang up the telephone with nothing to show for it. If the next step in which prospect will take is registering or selecting you personally, then you’ll want to be able to give them with two possible instances for meeting. TAGS: B2B lead generation, lead generation service, inside sales
Latest Articles in Business Category on EzineMark.com

Features of the online storage programs - March 18, 2012 by dharkanjhel

While in the past, exchanging files with other computer users implied to transfer the files on a memory stick and giving them to the respective person, today the process of file transferring has been significantly improved with the new online storage services. The free applications available online will allow you up to 50 GB of [...]
InternationalCallingCodes.net

Strong breeze still creating dangerous rip currents - March 17, 2012 by dharkanjhel

South Floridians are waking up to wet conditions with early morning showers passing through the region.


Ken Kaye’s Storm Center – South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com

Assemblyman Perez leads officials on Palm Springs area renewable energy tour - March 16, 2012 by dharkanjhel

<!–Saxotech Paragraph Count: 2
–>

Assemblyman V. Manuel Perez and his Select Committee on the Renewable Energy Economy in Rural California are in the Coachella and Imperial valleys today with desert officials, a tour of renewable energy sites, including in Palm Springs and at the Salton Sea, and a public hearing set to be held later in El Centro.

Desert Sun renewable energy reporter K Kaufmann is along for the ride today and will continue you posting updates, so look for those throughout the day. She can also be followed on Twitter @kkaufmann

Perez’s staff said before the visit that it’s more of a fact-finding tour to identify issues where the Legislature might be able to help promote clean energy development in the state’s rural areas.

Along with Perez, State Assemblymembers Steven Bradford (D-Gardena), Das Williams (D-Santa Barbara), and Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) were slated to attend.

The group enjoyed a welcome dinner Thursday evening from a group of valley business and civic leaders, including Coachella Valley Economic Partnership, RBF Consulting — an environmental-energy consulting firm – and Kaiser Restaurant. Along with good food, the committee got a presentation of local renewable energy issues.

Today, though,

Read More from the Article Source: http://www.mydesert.com/article/20120316/BUSINESS/120316003/Assemblyman-Perez-leads-officials-Palm-Springs-area-renewable-energy-tour?odyssey=nav%7Chead

Rocket News

« old entrysnew entrys »